Making smiles one wonky dollop at a time

One of my fondest memories with my children is making pancakes. Not the small, round pancakes we make when we’re in a hurry, but the fun ones. When my sons were little, they were Bigfoot pancakes. Sometimes they were green or blue, or brown. Other times they were plain batter colored, but they were always fun. The smiles those Bigfoot pancakes made are etched on my heart forever.

It’s amazing what a drop of pancake batter on a hot griddle can do for the Soul.

Even as my sons grew into somewhat obstinate teenagers, I continued the Bigfoot pancakes and while their glee turned to half-hidden crooked smiles, I knew they still enjoyed getting them as much as I enjoyed making them.

I’m happy to know that the fun pancake tradition has continued with my little girl. While she loves the Bigfoot pancakes, being very artistic, she has other creative ideas for her pancakes. Sometimes I have to let her know that while her creative ideas are brilliant, I am limited by my skills (or the lack thereof).

My daughter is obsessed with the Netflix show Nailed It!and yesterday we watched as they made pancake art. She took mental notes, as did I, and this morning, we made our own pancake art.

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Do I hear Ohhhhhs and Awwwws?

Before you send out too much praise, you should know that is’s supposed to be Minnie Mouse, not a cute bear wearing a bow. None of that really matters though. What does matter a hell of a lot to me is that smile. Not the crooked one on the not-Minnie, but the bright, beautiful smile on my little girl’s face.

Like the Bigfoot pancakes, the Minnie pancake was great fun and precious time I spent with my child, but the smile on her face – that’s what matters.

If you’d like to try these pancakes, the Bigfoot ones are quite easy. (I made them even easier with complete pancake mix, but use your favorite pancake recipe) Literally, just make a wonky dollop of batter, with the top end wider than the bottom, then add small dollops as the toes on the wide end. Here is an example below, with a little Mickey Mouse head. This is how we started with all of this and then my daughter had the idea to add color and details…that’s when it got a little more complicated – and way more fun.

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Notice our Bigfoot has only four toes? 🙂

You can make all sorts of characters. Below is a bunny we made for Easter one year.

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You could also do an orange carrot with green tops! 

This one was rather simple, even though it may look complicated. It’s just separate pancakes layered to make the bunny and I added raisin eyes and shaved coconut for the cotton tail.

Trust me, no matter how your pancake art turns out, the pancakes are sure to be delicious and the memories will last a lifetime. Have fun with it and enjoy the fruits of your labor!

xoxo

Resa

Pancake tips:
Preheat your griddle and add butter or coconut oil. You can test to see if it’s ready by shrinking water on it. If it sizzles, it’s ready for the batter.
If you’re making pancakes of varying sizes, you may want to make the larger ones first so you don’t forget to flip your smaller ones, which will cook faster.
For coloring:
Mix batter in large bowl, then separate out into small dishes to color individually. Add to icing bags (or ziplock bags as we used and cut a tiny hole in a corner for piping). Move quickly with your piping. Don’t worry, just go with it.
For flipping:
Wait until bubbles form in the batter and the edges are just slightly golden brown before you flip, otherwise you’ll be left with a gooey mess (trust me! I’ve tossed plenty of ruined pancakes in the trash) After you flip, give it another 30 seconds to minute to cook through before removing it.

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